“How Customer Culture Drives Customer Experience”  

  • By Greg Allardice
  • 05 Jul, 2016
 

Media Futures recently interviewed Dr Brown at the AMI CX Summit

Here’s a snap shot summary of what Dr Brown had to say –

 

1. Question :  How does Customer Culture drive customer experience?

 

Response : This involves a test and the test is what happens when things go wrong for the customer. Two things can initially happen, either you dismiss the problem or you are dragged begrudgingly to address the issue. The smart way is to ask how can we fix the customers problem.

There is a good example of the right way to handle the customer experience.

In this case a bike retailer in the USA. The story goes like this. A husband was having a birthday and the wife selected a new bike at a well known bike shop, Chris Zane Cycles which is renowned for customer service. Across the road was a restaurant, the wife was to take the husband to dinner and afterwards come across the road to the bike shop, point out the bike to the husband and say it’s yours…happy birthday. The bike had not been sold, but the responsible person had forgotten to put the bike in the window. The customer had paid a 50% deposit on the bike - $400    After dinner the husband and wife did indeed come across the road to the bike shop and you guessed it…..no bike to be seen, it had be sold and removed from the window. The wife rang the manager of Chris Zane cycles. The manager immediately went to see the wife, offered a 50% discount on another bike and vouchers for a meal for two at the same restaurant.

The wife was delighted and became an advocate for life. But the interesting thing is the person from the back roomwho removed the bike from the window persoanlly wrote a cheque to Chris Zane Cycles as compensation as it was that person’s mistake and should not have removed the bike from the window. The cheque is now framed and on display in a frame at Chris Zane cycles. This is a test of culture. What we do directly impacts the Customer Experience .


2. Question :  How do we confront superior CX and make it profitable?

 

Response: The first thing is to help everybody in the business develop a customer mindset. We know that between 40 to 70 % of buyers leave their supplier just because they think the supplier does not care. There needs to be training and development within organisations that says we expect you to to care about our customers. It is relatively inexpensive to put in place yet it has a big impact on customer retention. You can actually measure what it means to lose a customer and the impact on the business. The other take out is that people start to look at their processes and what they are actually doing in the business and what helps or inhibits the customer. In the banking and insurance industry as an example they have tried to simplify the legalese and jargon and make it simpler for the sales person to explain the policy and easier for customers to understand. The benefit to the business is a reduction in costs and a simpification of the process. The customer experience is superior and you are doing it in a way that is profitable.


3. Question :  Is crowd funding the new currency in the CX chain, does this generate new loyalty streams?

 

Response: I think it can. The sustainability of loyalty streams is yet to be proven but one example of it working is a company called Naked Wines who invite customers to be a part of a new wine vintage.  Members become “ Angel investors” the angel investors effectively fund the new vintages of boutique wineries. "Angels" pay $40 per month and build up a credit against which they can buy the new vintage wines from their favourite wineries.By connecting with the boutique vineyards they are interested in and becoming involved in new ventures and forward funding. In return they enjoy the new wine releases in which they have invested.

This is a good example of crowd funding.


4. Question:  What is the difference between a Chief Customer Officer and the Traditional Marketing Director?

 

Response:  The big difference is that the Chief Customer Officer has a role to help the business in superior customer experience across all touch points and look at ways to redesign the experience and improve it. The CX officer needs to be involved in the entire customer culture. It’s about the delivery of value and customer experience. The Marketing Director has traditionally been a function rather than across the whole business and has been a targetted approach for campaigns and new product developments. The CX officer requires a broader outlook and a customer culture which marketing should have lead but which has not lead in that direction. There is a big difference between the two.

 

Media Futures undertook this interview as an update on trends and thinking within the broader communications industry.

 

The aim is to be more predictive and how that effects future media models and audiences.

The payback to companies, organisations and advertisers is to be more precise in how they go to market and be able to operate more effectively.

 

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning and media buying have not addressed Customer Culture and Customer Experience it is worth investigating this important sector.

 


Contents copyright Media Futures 2016

 


 


 



 

         Dr Linden Brown Chairman Market Culture Inc

By Greg Allardice 19 Jan, 2018
If you feel that your media is not working, that your media is starting to drag the chain or that the current policy and strategy simply do not work anymore, these are clear signs that your media is in need of a relaunch.

The media model created to do the job well can alter without you actually seeing the subtle changes that occur behind the scenes. 
Things such as rate fluctuations, seasonal media audience variations, new media undercutting your preplanned audience numbers and over spending in one category are common traits that effect your media results.

When you find out about what is truly going on it's too late. You have spent your money and it's too bad you won't get it back.

How do you relaunch your media amidst constant change and generally too much information that leads you in the wrong direction.
What are the true market conditions ?

Your relaunch should take into account your business needs, revenues, profits and growth plans. Most importantly relaunch with a measured approach where you can change course without locking in large sums that a fixed and only become money wasters. 
A media relaunch becomes an integral part of your operation, not an added expense that drifts off to one side. 
With media audiences becoming more fragmented on a daily basis, a media relaunch sometimes is essential.

If your media has reached a plateau and lacking that certain sizzle, Media Futures recommends you seek out an independent media professional. Media policy, media strategy, media planning and media buying are an art not a science.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.






By Greg Allardice 28 Dec, 2017
Media is a cycle business. It never stays the same and has constant shifts and changes to keep the alert media policy maker, media strategy specialist, media planner and media buyer on their toes.

Why is this so?  The answer lies in the fickle nature of the illusive audience. When programmes , media formats and content changes, audiences go in search of something new. The media goes into a new cycle and essentially whilst some things remain regular such as a base audience , traffic flow or bolted on loyal users, the rest alters in a flash. 

This is evidenced in dramatic rating variations in free to air mediums and the constant scramble for share of voice in social and online platforms where attention spans are short.

How do you stay on top of the game?  Engage an independent media specialist who not only predicts the market but can assess the cycles to your advantage as a client or buyer.

This comes with experience and is not a job for juniors. It is a wealth of market experience built up at the coalface and knowing that cycles come and go regularly.

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit have not addressed Media Cycles it's time to seek out an independent media specialist.

Media Futures presents industry related articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.








By Greg Allardice 18 Dec, 2017
Media comes in all forms, some a perfect fit and some that does not make sense for your brand or service

Good media stacks up when the following fall into place

* The medium or mediums have a format or style that suits your product or service
* The audience is audited and you can measure usage patterns  by day parts
* The medium can supply effective frequency to drive recall and recognition
* Cost effectiveness is high 
* Value add is an option to extend impact to the target audience 

Bad media is not an option in any form . Avoid the pitfalls of investing in bad media that simply is not a fit.

Good media will make sense from the beginning, it flows naturally and the process of buying into good media time or space ticks all the boxes

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying or media audit have not addressed Good Media, Media Futures recommends you seek out an independent media specialist

Media Futures presents media articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment
By Greg Allardice 13 Dec, 2017
The general industry perception is that media takes a holiday over summer, audiences drop away and rates crash through the floor.

However media does not take a holiday, it operates 24/7 365 days and this time of the year has always been a great environment for smart advertisers who are ready to take advantage of the market conditions.

Consider these points as to why seasonal summer media in Australia makes sense.

* Regional markets come alive with tourists and holiday makers who do watch, read and listen to local media 
* Capital cities have an influx of foreign tourists
* Sport dominates media coverage and represents good buying for targetted audiences
* Seasonal retail, food and lifestyle products are ideal for online targetting particularly via mobile phone
* Selling of seasonal specials and clearance of stocks in readiness for the new year offerings make sense
* Back to school is always an important market for parents at end of school holidays

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning , media buying and media audit have not yet addressed Seasonal Media , then Media Futures recommends you seek out an independent media specialist.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.











By Greg Allardice 11 Dec, 2017
Media Futures has long promoted the mobile phone as a medium that cannot be ignored. Recent industry figures show that for 2018 Mobile phone digital expenditure is estimated to be 54 % of total digital spend with increases to as much as 72% by 2022.  These growth figures cannot be ignored and only serve to reinforce the "Media in your pocket" concept.
It is without a doubt the medium that makes sense on every media plan particularly in the 12 to 70 years markets.

As with all new mediums that have a hot run, everyone wants to be there. However consider these salient points-

* All growth mediums eventually plateau out in audience and time spent using

* The cost of doing business with new mediums that have rapid uptake of usage always become too expensive over time because of demand levels and greed of media owners to maximise profits

* New mediums of this type are best served with fine tuned targetting to improve ROI

* Work on short term buying patterns due to the influx of competitive low costs digital formats that only serve to erode audiences in your chosen market and with similar formats to the market leader

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit have not yet addressed
Mobile Growth, Media Futures recommends you seek out a n independent media professional.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.











By Greg Allardice 30 Nov, 2017
The discipline of media targetting is front and centre of every media planning undertaking. The fact is there is always going to be some wastage and no matter how well you target your message there will be people who see it or hear it that have no interest in your product or service. 

What do you do to minimise this wastage through your media targetting. 

* Factor in an estimate of the amount of wastage 
* Off set that predicted wastage against the rate negotiated for a unit of time or space
* Does the medium have a response channel where you can measure who and how many responses you achieve
* Is it sales or awareness only you are looking to achieve
* What clutter surrounds your message, how prominent will you be

Media targetting is key to maximising your return on investment but keep in mind that 100% effectiveness is unlikely.
Be realistic when approaching this segment of your media undertakings .

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit have not addressed media targetting it's time to seek out an independent media professional.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.






By Greg Allardice 26 Nov, 2017
If your media exposure patterns have become stale, boring, or just running out of ideas, then a media spectacular makes sense. This does not mean spending all your budget in one hit. The golden rules of reach , frequency and effective frequency still apply.  A media spectacular essentially means stepping into a new form of communication versus your tried and proven methods. It may involve sponsorship and key branding in a sporting code, event participation, big large outdoor formats, philanthropic giving that brings media coverage of a positive nature, seasonal festivals or creating a major media event which you design and control. Media is an open book, not just confined to units of  time and space. The purpose of this article is to open the thinking patterns to achieve a break through when media has become stale or cluttered and you are just not getting results. 

Think Media Spectacular if you are not cutting through with current media practices.

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit are not working effectively consider an independent media professional.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving returns on media investment.








By Greg Allardice 19 Nov, 2017
Time was when the small screen meant TV or small media meant a small press advt. However in 2017 small media means your computer screen or mobile phone.

According to Sensis Report 2016 Laptop ownership is 70%,  Smartphone ownership 76%,  Tablet 53%,  Desktop 54 % 
Internet usage more than 5 times per day is 55 % 

In fact the numbers are much higher. Walk down the street , sit in a cafe, travel on public transport and you will see much higher percentages using the small screen.

The purpose of this blog is to put out a wake up call to all marketers and advertisers.  " Think small!!! "
Yes, think about how to capture the attention of your current and new customers on the small screen and then work backwards into TV and large screen formats such as outdoor and cinema.

Why is this so?? 

The attention span of the average consumer is about 3 seconds, if you don't grab then then , they are gone.
There is so much clutter on all media and the small screen is a smorgsabord of choice.  The need to create powerful effective " small " communications has never been greater.

This involves a turn around in thinking and both at a creative and media usage level. Using tried and proven practices of even 2 years ago is a lazy approach to creative development. 

Think" small" and your world instantly becomes bigger.

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit are not thinking" small" it's time to talk to an independent media professional.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment.



By Greg Allardice 09 Nov, 2017
In this current economic cycle, media budgets are under great pressure. That means they are being cut, reduced or just not actioned.

Why is this so? Commercial media budgets are set by accountants and CEO's, despite the best efforts of the
Marketing Director to set a budget to grow sales, improve market share and  attract/retain new customers.
Sadly this trend will continue.
The media budget cycle will continue to spiral down in real or indexed terms till the powers that sign off on media budgets recognise that media is an investment, not a cost item.

So how to go about creating a media budget in this current sick state of the media economy?

* Recognise that if competitors in your category are also chopping media budgets then you have the opportunity to increase your budget over a shorter space of time to gain market dominance.

* Set media budget numbers over a 3 year year cycle, but manage quarterly to keep track of unforeseen impacts

* Set your media budget not based on past budget numbers, but  as a percentage of forward sales calculations 

* Budget for growth. Make your budget a part of forward business planning in line with the overall goals and objectives 

* Set regular measurement bench marks against media budget and have guarantees in place if results fall short

* Be brave and don't allow the back room bean counters to dictate the media budget and put you in a  "no win "position

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit have not addressed media budgets, Media Futures recommends you seek out out an independent media professional

Media Futures presents industry articles in the constant quest for improving return on media investment
By Greg Allardice 07 Nov, 2017
Media is a seductive beast. It lures you to watch it, read it or listen to it. When making commercial media decisions this seductiveness can take over which leads to poor decisions on how to invest your media budget. The media pitfalls are many and there are millions of cases where poor choices have resulted in the media campaign being a total waste of time and money.

Here are some common pitfalls -

* Believing that media will solve your business issues
* Putting all your eggs in one basket and stacking your media buy into one particular medium
* Failing to check the detail of your media buy before it commences
* Not looking closer into how your media buy will translate in a cluttered media environment
* Believing everything you are told and relying on glossy presentations to win your media spend
* Working initially with a senior media operatives only to have a junior with no practical experience handle the detail
* Failing to conduct post campaign audit and analysing what you actually got

The common thread here is making decisions based on emotional beliefs that the media process will deliver in bucket loads. When you look at the big picture your media spend is only a very small fraction of the total output and therefore what might seem big and impressive to you is really quite insignificant when it happens.

If your media policy, media strategy, media planning, media buying and media audit have by passed the pitfalls of commercial media, it's time to engage with with an independent media professional.

Media Futures presents industry articles in the conquest quest for improving returns on media investment.


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